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3: Water


ABOVE is the natural and human directed flow of storm water flow City wide. Decatur Street demarcates the Eastern Continental Divide thus  our storm water flows both to the Atlantic Ocean and to the Gulf of Mexico.

SYNERGY OF  1)MACRO AND 2)MICRO ELEMENTS WORKING TOGETHER TO SAVE RESOURSES FOR THE City Of Atlanta (COA) and McGill Place

  1. MACRO SCALE MAP (AT LEFT):
    A COA analysis showing stormwater* flow from the McGill Place Hilltop into the Clear Creek System.
    * Stormwater is clean water (called “graywater”, good for irrigation) VS sewage  (“blackwater”, which needs off-site COA processing to be safe.)

Macro scale: Keeping stormwater onsite helps the COA’s old fashioned, undersized storm water system.
The following .pdfs* illustrate the COA challenges with old 19th century storm water/sanitary systems designed for a much smaller population:
WHOLE REPORT: COA Land-Water-City Storm Water Report
PARTIAL showing McGill Place –Clear Creek Storm Water Report
(*reports by Ga Tech architectural students)

2. MICRO SCALE MAP (BELOW): McGill sits on a high hill with an elevation of 1014′ ASL (above sea level) at the highest point.
Micro scale: Looking for ways to keep our rainwater onsite to water our biomass (trees and plants) and cut down irrigation $$$, we also help the COA.

  1. Water flows down all sides of a high point 1014 above sea level. The land absorbs rainwater then gravity directs any impervious (non-absorbing) parking lot runoff  into 3 directions:
    1/3 of flow: North “Gulch” flume goes into the COA’s (City of Atlanta) overloaded system, which switches about a block to the north to combined sewer/storm water. It is a mystery what happens after this but the City is being fined for this old fashioned system. Needs further research but McGill Place could help out by keeping our storm water onsite as much as possible..
    1/2 of flow: SW water shelter pond-absorbs into ground. There is overflow here as well from/to the COA street system. This system could be more attractive but works keeping water onsite.
    1/6 of flow: a COA  system at the south is minimal and can be solved with a creek bed to keep all water from this direction onsite and watering grass and plants.
  2. Creek beds are planned to keep more water onsite.


RESOURCES: Tools and guidelines the McGill 3:WATER plan is utilizing for GBCI EXISTING LANDSCAPE Certification:
(McGill EXISTING LANDSCAPE is an abbreviated version of NEW COSTRUCTION SITES RATING SYSTEM)
EXISTING SITES Rating System .pdf:  RatingSystem_SITES –Conversion to Existing Landscapes Pilot
SITES V2 Book (EXISTING LANDSCAPE is an abbreviated version of NEW COSTRUCTION): https://www.usgbc.org/resources/sites-rating-system-and-scorecard
PROFESSIONAL SUSTAINABILITY LANDSCAPE TOOLS: https://www.landscapeperformance.org/
EXISTING SITES Slide Presentation used in video on Welcome page: SITES Intro to Existing Landscapes Pilot_Final[22]


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